Document Type

Brief

Publication Date

2020

Abstract

Efforts to eliminate female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) intensified in many parts of Africa following a 2012 United Nations General Assembly Resolution, but change has been uneven. Important evidence gaps remain in our understanding of why the practice declines, changes, or persists in specific locations. Policymakers and program planners need such information to better tailor interventions to address local patterns and focus resources on abandonment efforts in areas with the greatest needs. To fill these gaps, researchers with the Evidence to End FGM/C consortium analyzed nationally representative household survey data for Kenya, Nigeria, and Senegal. The results of their research identify geographic hotspots with high FGM/C prevalence, explore changes to the practice, and analyze individual and community characteristics linked to a greater likelihood of FGM/C. These findings provide a deeper understanding of local trends and identify some of the specific factors responsible for driving change in each country. This Evidence Brief summarizes key findings for all three countries and their implications for policymaking and program planning.

DOI

10.31899/rh11.1049

Language

English

Project

Evidence to End FGM/C: Research to Help Girls and Women Thrive

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