Document Type

Report

Publication Date

2020

Abstract

Although the prevalence of female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) in Egypt among married women aged 15–49 years is high (92 percent), in the most recent (2014) Demographic and Health Survey, prevalence rates appear to be declining among younger cohorts of girls and women. Support for the discontinuation of the practice is more widespread in younger generations, among females, and among those living in urban areas. Variations in attitudes toward FGM/C by education level and wealth status are also documented. While numerous studies have examined the reasons why people practice FGM/C, few studies have examined the characteristics of the individuals who have abandoned the practice. In this study, we sought to examine the characteristics of abandoners and explore the geographic patterns of FGM/C abandonment; explore benefits gained and challenges faced by abandoners within their families/communities; and understand how families and individuals overcome social sanctions and mitigate against the risk of relapse.

DOI

10.31899/rh11.1045

Language

English

Project

Evidence to End FGM/C: Research to Help Girls and Women Thrive

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