Document Type

Report

Publication Date

2007

Abstract

The Horizons program, in partnership with International Medical Corps and Steadman Research Services International, conducted an intervention study in Kibera, an urban slum in Nairobi, Kenya to determine what effect three different community-based activities had on utilization of key prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) services. The interventions included moving services closer to the population via mobile clinics, as well as increasing psychosocial support through the use of traditional birth attendants and peer counselors as PMTCT promoters. Data from the study showed that there were positive trends during the study period in most of the PMTCT indicators, including knowledge of MTCT, antenatal care utilization, and delivery in health facilities. However, it is not possible to attribute all these positive trends to the community-based interventions because similar positive trends were observed at the comparison site on most indicators. The report offers recommendations to other organizations exploring community-based PMTCT activities in a similar context.

DOI

doi.org/10.31899/HIV2.1017

Language

English

Project

Horizons Program

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