Document Type

Report

Publication Date

2013

Abstract

This Population Council study tested the feasibility of implementing intimate-partner violence (IPV) screening protocols in healthcare settings in Kenya where sexual and gender-based violence service referrals could be executed. Providers drawn from these sites were trained to routinely screen for IPV and to refer IPV-positive clients identified through this process for further care. This study demonstrates that providers, given the training, are willing and able to incorporate IPV screening into their practice—one that they perform in a severely resource-constrained context. Likewise, the findings indicate that incorporating IPV screening questions into client intake forms in a variety of public healthcare settings is not only acceptable to clients, but is welcomed as an opportunity to air grievances and trauma. These are initial and important findings and steps forward in the field of violence response and prevention work.

DOI

doi.org/10.31899/rh3.1012

Language

English

Project

Expanding the Evidence Base on Comprehensive Care for Survivors of Sexual Violence in East and Southern Africa

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